MoMA

MoMA CLASSES

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The People’s Art Center

A central part of MoMA’s program from 1948 to 1961, The People’s Art Center was conceived as an incubator for critical thinking, art making, and creativity. It’s this mission that drives what we do today, and that inspired our new series of programs.

Immerse yourself in ideas and opportunities to see your world in new ways through art. Classes, artist-led immersions, and experiences can help you develop new perspectives and become a part of a community of learners unlike any other. In our studios and galleries, you can co-create artworks with MoMA’s artists; on the streets of Midtown, explore the neighborhood with our experts; and dive deep into new concepts and new conversations with innovators and visionaries.

If you can’t make it to MoMA, we also offer both instructor-led and self-guided MoMA Courses Online. Learn more about MoMA Courses Online.


Evening Classes

“Stop thinking about art works as objects, and start thinking about them as triggers for experiences.”—Brian Eno

Explore various periods of modern and contemporary art through programs led by MoMA curators and other prominent experts, both inside and outside MoMA’s galleries.


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Dada: Art and Anti-Art

Starts July 11
4 Mondays
Instructor: Heather Cotter

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In the wake of World War I, Dada was born. Quickly it spread to become an international art movement, with centers in Switzerland, Berlin, and New York. With its antiestablishment stance, Dada embodied an outlook shared by many following the war; distrust of authority and a malaise with the status quo. Artists associated with the Dada movement turned this negative sentiment into a positive, generative force, showing an affinity for breaking the rules—and inventing their own. In this course, we will look at leaders of the Dada movement, including Marcel Duchamp and Tristan Tzara, and see how their art and antics served to redefine the nature of art in the modern era.

Heather Cotter (MA, Boston University, and MEd with a specialization in art education, Harvard University) is a lecturer at MoMA.

Register Online
Day

Monday

Sessions

4

Time

6:30–8:20 p.m.

Schedule
7/11, 7/18, 7/25, 8/1
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
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The Art of Dance: Degas and Beyond

Starts July 5
4 Tuesdays
Instructor: Larissa Bailiff

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Taking Edgar Degas’s late-19th-century ballet pictures as a starting point, this class will explore the fascinating intersection of art and dance from multiple perspectives and across several decades, from the 1870s to the 1950s. During these pivotal times, a new appreciation of dance manifested, blurring the boundaries between the disciplines of visual art and performance, enriching and liberating the aesthetic possibilities of each modern form. Performer Loïe Fuller literally embodied the spirit of the Art Nouveau, while dancer/choreographer Mary Wigman’s movements came directly from an Expressionist ethos, propelling dance as a form forward. Visual artists such as Degas, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Auguste Rodin, Henri Matisse, and Ernst Ludwig Kirchner were inspired to represent the subject of the dance and the dancer, while others engaged in producing playbills, stage sets, and costumes for the theater. Painter Oskar Schlemmer produced several mechanistic ballets, turning his dancers into “living sculpture,” while the 30-year collaboration between sculptor Isamu Noguchi and choreographer Martha Graham remains an icon of the modernist era. The “art of dance” provides us with rich ground for study and discussion. Shall we dance?

Over the last 12 years, Larissa Bailiff has worked as an educator and instructor for MoMA, teaching over 25 in-gallery courses. Her specialty is modern European art and culture, especially that of France and Spain. She recently published a catalogue essay on Agustí Puig, the contemporary Catalan artist whose work was featured in Woody Allen’s 2008 film Viki Cristina Barcelona. In recent months, she has been developing content for a new immersive arts-education and technology company called Woofbert.

Register Online
Day

Tuesday

Sessions

4

Time

6:30–8:20 p.m.

Schedule
7/5, 7/19, 7/26, 8/2
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
Daytime Classes

“Stop thinking about art works as objects, and start thinking about them as triggers for experiences.”—Brian Eno

Explore various periods of modern and contemporary art through programs led by MoMA curators and other prominent experts, both inside and outside MoMA’s galleries.


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Summer of Love

Starts July 6
4 Wednesdays
Instructor: Joan Pachner

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1967, the Summer of Love and of Woodstock, conjures images of free love, psychedelic drugs, and rock and roll, and marks a moment when radical cultural change seemed to emanate across the coasts, from San Francisco and New York. In the art world, large-scale sculpture and experiments in art and technology dominated headlines, with the use of new media like video becoming increasingly important for performance art and independent production. While these diverse and interrelated approaches coexisted with innovative graphic arts and design of this rambunctious moment, they have rarely been considered as part of the same cultural cauldron. Using the installation From the Collection: 1960–1969 as our framework, this class will weave together international changes in art and design of the later 1960s. The diverse roster of artists we will explore includes Lynda Benglis, Valie Export, Dan Flavin, David Hammons, Eva Hesse, Roberto Matta, Victor Moscoso, and Yvonne Rainer.

Joan Pachner (PhD, New York University, Institute of Fine Arts) specializes in modern sculpture, and for the past 10 years she has lectured regularly at MoMA. She published a monograph on David Smith (Phaidon, 2013), was a curatorial consultant and catalogue coauthor for Tony Smith: Architect, Painter, Sculpture (MoMA, 1988), and is currently working on a catalogue raisonné of Tony Smith's sculpture. In addition, she was a curatorial consultant at Storm King Art Center (1996–2005). Pachner has published and lectured on other important 20th-century sculptors, including Anthony Caro, Gaston Lachaise, Jose de Rivera, and George Segal.

Register Online
Day

Wednesday

Sessions

4

Time

11:00 a.m.–12:50 p.m.

Schedule
7/6, 7/13, 7/20, 7/27
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
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Photography in/as Contemporary Art

Starts July 6
4 Wednesdays
Instructor: David Smucker

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This course uses MoMA’s collection and special exhibitions to offer insights into photography’s place in the art world, from celluloid film to cellphone cameras. Dadaist experimenters in the early 20th century made cut-and-pasted collages from photographs and bits of film, as seen in Dadaglobe Reconstructed. BRUCE CONNER: IT’S ALL TRUE shows how Conner updated this practice for the medium of film by creating cinematic collages and multimedia experiments beginning in the 1960s. Also during the 1960s, photography began to play an expanded role in Conceptual and Pop art, as seen in works on view by Andy Warhol, Bernd and Hilla Becher, and others. We will have the opportunity to see Nan Goldin’s groundbreaking diary of ecstasy and pain, The Ballad of Sexual Dependency, in the 35mm slideshow format that the artist herself used to project for her peers, often backed by music from Maria Callas or the Velvet Underground. Installations by Rachel Harrison and Bouchra Khalili steer the course into the present day, where Harrison’s Perth Amboy installation uses photography and sculpture to explore basic acts of looking and seeing, and Khalili’s The Mapping Journey Project documents the global travels of people displaced by political and economic circumstances. This course shows how photography—as a medium of artistic experimentation, a method of performance documentation, an element of installation art, the foundation of avant-garde filmmaking, and more—plays a vital role in, and as, contemporary art.

David Smucker is a PhD candidate in art history and criticism at Stony Brook University. His research focuses on contemporary art and the history of photography, and his in-progress dissertation examines photography’s relationship to car travel and the American road trip.

Register Online
Day

Wednesday

Sessions

4

Time

2:00 p.m.–3:50 p.m.

Schedule
7/6, 7/13, 7/20, 7/27
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
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Summer in the Sculpture Garden

Starts July 7
4 Thursdays
Instructor: Deborah A. Goldberg

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The Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Garden has a fascinating history, from its design by the architect Philip Johnson through succeeding decades of famous and influential exhibitions and installations. In this context, we will study some of the Sculpture Garden’s iconic figurative sculptures, explore a forthcoming reinstallation focusing on abstract sculpture from the 1950s and 1960s, and discuss recent curatorial directions in the Sculpture Garden. We will look at related works in MoMA’s collection, including the interdisciplinary fourth-floor installation From the Collection: 1960–1969.

Deborah A. Goldberg (PhD, the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University) teaches art history at the School of Visual Arts, lectures regularly at The Metropolitan Museum of Art and MoMA, and lectures on sculpture for the Christie’s Master’s Program. She designed an online art history course (Modern Art: 1880–1945) for MoMA, and has written audio tours for exhibitions at MoMA and the High Museum in Atlanta, and modern and contemporary audio stops for the collection of The Metropolitan Museum of Art. She wrote the catalogue for the exhibition Isamu Noguchi, Patent Holder: Designing the World of Tomorrow, at the M. T. Geoffrey Yeh Art Gallery at St. John’s University (2015), and coedited and contributed a chapter to the book Alexander Archipenko Revisited: An International Perspective (Archipenko Foundation, 2008).

Register Online
Day

Thursday

Sessions

4

Time

11:00 a.m.–12:50 p.m.

Schedule
7/7, 7/14, 7/21, 7/28
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
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The Art of Dance: Degas and Beyond

Starts July 7
4 Thursdays
Instructor: Larissa Bailiff

View detail
Close
Balletscene_467x272

Taking Edgar Degas’s late-19th-century ballet pictures as a starting point, this class will explore the fascinating intersection of art and dance from multiple perspectives and across several decades, from the 1870s to the 1950s. During these pivotal times, a new appreciation of dance manifested, blurring the boundaries between the disciplines of visual art and performance, enriching and liberating the aesthetic possibilities of each modern form. Performer Loïe Fuller literally embodied the spirit of the Art Nouveau, while dancer/choreographer Mary Wigman’s movements came directly from an Expressionist ethos, propelling dance as a form forward. Visual artists such as Degas, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Auguste Rodin, Henri Matisse, and Ernst Ludwig Kirchner were inspired to represent the subject of the dance and the dancer, while others engaged in producing playbills, stage sets, and costumes for the theater. Painter Oskar Schlemmer produced several mechanistic ballets, turning his dancers into “living sculpture,” while the 30-year collaboration between sculptor Isamu Noguchi and choreographer Martha Graham remains an icon of the modernist era. The “art of dance” provides us with rich ground for study and discussion. Shall we dance?

Over the last 12 years, Larissa Bailiff has worked as an educator and instructor for MoMA, teaching over 25 in-gallery courses. Her specialty is modern European art and culture, especially that of France and Spain. She recently published a catalogue essay on Agustí Puig, the contemporary Catalan artist whose work was featured in Woody Allen’s 2008 film Viki Cristina Barcelona. In recent months, she has been developing content for a new immersive arts-education and technology company called Woofbert.

Register Online
Day

Thursday

Sessions

4

Time

2:00–3:50 p.m.

Schedule
7/7, 7/14, 7/21, 7/28
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
Studio Immersions

These four-week, studio-based classes develop students’ techniques and creative insights by exploring intersections between art history and artistic practice.


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The Modern Studio: Radical Art in the 1960s

Starts July 19
3 Tuesdays
Instructor: Corey D’Augustine

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The 1960s was a decade of extreme upheaval and violence. Shaken by events as disparate as the bombing of North Vietnam, the Civil Rights Movement, and the Beatles, artists exploded the Modernist notion of a self-contained artwork in favor of experimental concepts, materials and processes in a wide array of international movements such as Pop, Minimalism and Fluxus. This course will examine the wide array of creative strategies in the 60s through a combination of art historical lectures, extended visits to the MoMA galleries, and studio sessions where students will make paintings and other objects based on these works. Artists considered will include Gerhard Richter, Eva Hesse, Robert Rauschenberg, Alberto Burri, James Rosenquist, Agnes Martin, Andy Warhol, Yayoi Kusama and many more. No previous painting experience is necessary.

Corey D’Augustine is a painting conservator, a professor of art history, and an artist.

Register Online
Day

Tuesday

Sessions

3

Time

6:30–9:50 p.m.

Schedule
7/19, 7/26, 8/2
Capacity
12
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
Artist-Led

These intimate, artist-led workshops and seminars use contemporary art as a source of inspiration.


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Political Printmaking: The 1960s and Today SOLD OUT

June 4
1 Saturday
Instructors: Kerry Downey and Dread Scott

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Drawing from MoMA’s current installation From the Collection: 1960–1969, artists Kerry Downey and Dread Scott facilitate a gallery conversation and studio printmaking workshop exploring the ways politics have been pictured—both as urgent responses and imagined possibilities, showing what the world is and what it could be. Downey and Scott will discuss how art functions politically. Under what conditions is an artwork made? How is it distributed? What visual strategies are being used? Following a gallery discussion, participants will consider these questions through hands-on experiments with monoprinting. Many profound issues are being debated today: Black Lives Matter, abortion rights, gender norms and the transgender movement, endless war, immigration, global climate change, etc. As this workshop will be thinking expansively about what constitutes the “political,” participants are encouraged to be playful, uncertain, curious, and poetic. No prior skills or knowledge necessary.

Dread Scott makes revolutionary art to propel history forward. In 1989, while he was a student at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (where he received a BFA), he first received national attention when his art caused a controversy over its use of the American flag; the work was denounced by President G.H.W. Bush and outlawed by Congress. Dread Scott's art has been exhibited at the Whitney Museum of American Art, MoMA PS1, the Walker Art Center, and the Pori Art Museum in Finland. In 2012 BAM (Brooklyn Academy of Music) presented his performance Dread Scott: Decision. He is the recipient of a Creative Capital Foundation grant, a Pollock-Krasner grant, and fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts. His work is in the collection of the Whitney and the Akron Art Museum. He works in a range of mediums, including installation, photography, screenprinting, video, and performance. He is on the board of directors of the New York Foundation for the Arts.

Kerry Downey is an interdisciplinary artist and teacher whose work explores the various ways we come in contact with each other physically, psychologically, and sociopolitically. Downey's videos, prints, and performances reimagine the possibilities and limitations of gender, intimacy, and support in late capitalist America. She is a recent recipient of the Joan Mitchell Emerging Artist Grant and her work has recently been exhibited at LACE, Los Angeles; The Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College, Annandale; The Drawing Center, New York; Taylor Macklin, Zurich; and REVERSE, Brooklyn. Downey has been teaching at MoMA since 2007, and has recently taught at Hunter College and at Parsons School of Design. She holds a BA from Bard College and an MFA from Hunter College.

Register Online
Day

Saturday

Sessions

1

Time

1:00–4:30 p.m.

Schedule
6/4
Non Member

$50 SOLD OUT

Member and Corporate Member employees

$40 SOLD OUT

Student/Educator

$30 SOLD OUT

Sound Amplification Available
Frequently Asked Questions


Payment

We accept all major credit cards. To register and pay visit the online registration system.

Discount

Students, educators (K–12, college, and university), and staff of other museums receive a discount on the member rate. Student or staff identification must be presented upon check-in on the first day of class.

Refunds

In order to receive a full refund, notice of cancellation must be sent in writing via email, letter, or fax at least one week before the first scheduled day of class. Payment will not be refunded after this time. Refund processing may take up to four weeks.


If I drop the class can I get a refund?
You will only receive a refund if you cancel your registration at least one week before the first day of class. You may do this by accessing your online registration and clicking the "Modify" tab. You will be able to unregister yourself from a class and receive a full refund. You may also cancel your registration by phone or email. Refund processing may take up to four weeks.

Can I get a refund after the second or third class?
MoMA is unable to grant refunds after the refund period.

If I miss a class can I receive a refund or a make up classes with the instructor?
No. MoMA provides course schedules in advance to provide perspective students the opportunity to plan ahead and make necessary arrangements to attend classes. Students will receive a syllabus and course reader in advance to help themselves prepare for missing class.

Can I take a MoMA Class for credit?
No. MoMA Classes are not accredited. If you wish to receive credit for a MoMA Class, you must organize this with your institution.

How do I register?
To register for online courses, use the online registration system.

Do I have to register online?
Yes. If you have any difficulties using the online registration system, please call (212) 408-8441.

How do I know if a class is full?
If a class is full the website will indicate that the course is sold out. Please note that updates to class availability are made during business hours and courses may fill up overnight or over the weekend. You will know a course is sold out when you attempt to register and the only option you are given is to add your name to the waiting list.

Can I be put on a waiting list for a class that is filled?
Yes. The online registration form includes a waiting list option for sold-out classes. You must fill out the online registration form to be added to the waiting list. Once you complete the registration, you will receive an email confirming that you have been added to the waiting list.

What if I am a member of the Museum?
As a member at the individual level or higher you will receive the members rate. We honor a first-come, first-served policy for class registration regardless of your member status.

How do I sign up for a membership?
If you are not a member and would like to sign up for membership, simply visit the Membership page. If you have any questions about membership, please call Membership Services at (212) 708-9475.

Are Corporate Member employees eligible to receive the member discount?
Yes. A copy of your valid company ID must be faxed or emailed to the Corporate Membership Department in order to receive the discounted price.

Will the class have access to the galleries?
When possible, as determined by your instructor and MoMA, students will have the unique privilege to view MoMA's collection in the galleries after hours, during class time.

Will these specific courses be offered again?
Yes and no. There are some courses that will be offered regularly, for example Modern Art 1880–1945 and Modern and Contemporary Art 1945–Present. Some classes may be offered again depending on the instructor's availability, scheduling, and student interest. MoMA cannot guarantee if or when certain classes will be offered again.

If I miss a class and there is another section of the same class being offered on a different day, can I attend the other section of the same course?
No. Each course instructor utilizes a different syllabus. Although there are two sections of the same class offered, the material covered would not necessarily correspond.

Can I register my friend?
Yes. Once you have entered your personal information and selected a class in the online registration form, click the "Add Person" button. Fill out the registration form for this person and be sure to use a separate email address for him or her. Our registration system will not accept multiple registrants with the same email address. Your registration is complete after you have filled out all the required information for both you and your friend and submitted payment. Please note that you will each receive an email confirming your individual registration. Your confirmation email will NOT include a record of your friend's registration information.

Can I bring a friend or family member to attend one of my class sessions so they can experience the program?
No. Though we welcome interest in MoMA Classes, we cannot accommodate guests.


Policies

MoMA reserves the right to cancel or withdraw classes, to change class curricula and scheduling, and to withdraw and substitute instructors.

If an instructor needs to cancel an individual class, we will notify you via phone or email and that class will be made up at a later date.

Students accept full responsibility for personal injury and/or losses suffered during class hours and while on museum premises.

MoMA will not release course participants’ personal information to any persons or organizations outside of the Museum without prior written consent.