MoMA

MoMA CLASSES

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The People’s Art Center

A central part of MoMA's program from 1948 to 1961, The People’s Art Center was conceived as an incubator for critical thinking, art making, and creativity. It's this mission that drives what we do today, and that inspired our new series of programs.

Immerse yourself in ideas and opportunities to see your world in new ways through art. Classes, artist-led immersions, and experiences can help you develop new perspectives and become a part of a community of learners unlike any other. In our studios and galleries, you can co-create artworks with MoMA’s artists; on the streets of Midtown, explore the neighborhood with our experts; and dive deep into new concepts and new conversations with innovators and visionaries.

If you can’t make it to MoMA, we also offer both instructor-led and self-guided MoMA Courses Online. Learn more about MoMA Courses Online.


Evening Classes

“Stop thinking about art works as objects, and start thinking about them as triggers for experiences.”—Brian Eno

Explore various periods of modern and contemporary art through programs led by MoMA curators and other prominent experts, both inside and outside MoMA’s galleries.


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A Closer Look at Jackson Pollock

Starts February 9
4 Tuesdays
Instructor: Heather Cotter

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Jackson Pollock is an iconic artist of mid-century modernism whose monumental drip canvases—which evoke the tension and drama of the era in which they were created—are some of the most recognizable images of the Abstract Expressionist movement. But these represent only one segment of a larger body of work produced by the artist. In conjunction with the exhibition Jackson Pollock: A Collection Survey, 1934–1954, this course looks at Pollock’s work in depth, exploring his influences, his varied and diverse styles of painting, and the impact he had on artists that followed him.

Heather Cotter (MA, Boston University, and MEd with a specialization in art education, Harvard University) is a lecturer at MoMA.

Register Online
Day

Tuesday

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–7:50 p.m.

Schedule
2/9, 2/16, 3/1, 3/8
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
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Eye on Abstraction, 1880–1955

Starts February 10
4 Wednesdays
Instructor: Elisabeth Bardt-Pellerin

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Why would artists turn away from depicting recognizable subjects to create works with little apparent reference to the visible world? This course explores abstraction in MoMA’s collection, beginning with precursors like Paul Cézanne and Pablo Picasso before turning to pioneers such as Kazimir Malevich and Piet Mondrian; interwar artists including Joan Miró and Paul Klee; and 1950s Abstract Expressionists such as Jackson Pollock and Barnett Newman.

Students learn about the beginnings of abstraction and consider its impact as what many consider the most dramatic innovation of modernism. Over four weeks, the class explores how the adoption of abstraction encouraged technical exploration and discovery, while also acting as a vehicle for diverse ideas.

Elisabeth Bardt-Pellerin (MA in art education, Concordia University, Montreal) is a frequent lecturer at MoMA and the Guggenheim Museum.

Register Online
Day

Wednesday

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–7:50 p.m.

Schedule
2/10, 2/17, 2/24, 3/9
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
1207

Nothing Is Ever New: Histories of Contemporary Art

Starts February 22
4 Mondays
Instructor: Ágnes Berecz

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How do we account for the recurrences and cycles of repetition that inform the production of objects, spaces, and images in contemporary art? How do we understand the multilayered relationships between contemporary practices and the culture of the historical and “neo” avant-gardes? This course addresses histories of postwar and contemporary art through close readings of works—from objects and assemblages to performances and videos—currently on view in the Museum. Artists to be discussed include Marcel Broodthaers, Vija Celmins, DIS, Tacita Dean, Ernie Gehr, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, David Hammons, Maria Hassabi, David Hartt, Camille Henrot, Katharina Gaenssler, Lele Saveri, Allan Sekula, Niki de Saint Phalle, and Hito Steyerl, among many others. In conjunction with the exhibitions Scenes for a New Heritage: Contemporary Art from the Collection, Ocean of Images: New Photography 2015, and Marcel Broodthaers.

Ágnes Berecz (PhD, Université Paris I, Panthéon-Sorbonne) is an art historian and an associate professor at Christie’s Education New York. She also teaches at Pratt Institute and lectures at MoMA. Her writings have appeared in Art Journal, Art in America, Artmargins, and the Yale University Art Gallery Bulletin, and in European and U.S. exhibition catalogues.

Register Online
Day

Monday

Sessions

4

Time

8:00–9:50 p.m.

Schedule
2/22, 2/29, 3/7, 3/14
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
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Histories of Modernism, 1889–1919

Starts March 14
4 Mondays
Instructor: Jennifer Katanic

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This class focuses on key developments in an emerging international avant-garde between the years 1889 and 1919. Moving from Vincent van Gogh’s The Starry Night to Kazimir Malevich’s Suprematist Composition: White on White, our sessions will explore the emerging tendencies in art across three decades of innovation and experimentation that formed the foundations of modernism. Artists covered include Paul Cézanne, Vincent Van Gogh, Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, and many more.

Taking this class in conjunction with Histories of Modernism, 1948–1969 is recommended.

Jennifer Katanic (PhD candidate, The Graduate Center, City University of New York) is a specialist in postwar Central European art and culture. She is a lecturer in MoMA's Department of Education and works with International Art Guides as a contemporary art educator at Art Basel Miami Beach. She has taught art history at Rutgers University and City College, New York.

Register Online
Day

Monday

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–7:50 p.m.

Schedule
3/14, 3/21, 3/28, 4/4
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
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Modern Beginnings: Impressionists From the Collection

Starts March 16
4 Wednesdays
Instructor: Larissa Bailiff

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This class investigates the lives and achievements of some early masters in MoMA’s collection: the Impressionists. Their radical, evolving experimentation with subject matter, style, and materials overturned decades of artistic tradition, broke the stronghold of the insular French Salon system, and definitively ushered in what we now call modernism. Through sessions in the classroom, in MoMA’s galleries, and in the Drawings and Prints Study Center, we will examine paintings, drawings, and prints from the 1860s to the 1920s. Artists discussed include Edgar Degas, Paul Cézanne, Mary Cassatt, Berthe Morisot, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Camille Pissarro, and Claude Monet.

Taking this class in conjunction with Edgar Degas: The Printer of Modern Life is recommended.

Over the last 12 years, Larissa Bailiff has worked as an educator and instructor for MoMA, teaching over 25 in-gallery courses. Her specialty is modern European art and culture, especially that of France and Spain. She recently published a catalogue essay on Agustí Puig, the contemporary Catalan artist whose work was featured in Woody Allen’s 2008 film Viki Cristina Barcelona. In recent months, she has been developing content for a new immersive arts-education and technology company called Woofbert.

Register Online
Day

Wednesday

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–7:50 p.m.

Schedule
3/16, 3/23, 3/30, 4/6
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
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Radical Practice: Art of the 1960s

Starts March 30
4 Wednesdays
Instructor: Joan Pachner

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This class explores radical artistic developments of the 1960s from a global, multimedia perspective. Discussions cover a range of mediums—including photography, video, commercial design, and architecture—and intersecting aesthetic developments between countries and movements such as Pop art, Minimalism, post-Minimalism and Conceptual art. Artists explored will include both widely acknowledged and lesser-known masters, including Robert Adams, Diane Arbus, Richard Avedon, Günter Brus, Gego, Eva Hesse, Jasper Johns, Louis Kahn, James Rosenquist, Richard Serra, Robert Smithson, and Andy Warhol.

Joan Pachner (PhD, New York University, Institute of Fine Arts) specializes in modern sculpture, and for the past 10 years she has lectured regularly at MoMA. She published a monograph on David Smith (Phaidon, 2013), was a curatorial consultant and catalogue coauthor for Tony Smith: Architect, Painter, Sculpture (MoMA, 1988), and is currently working on a catalogue raisonné of Tony Smith's sculpture. In addition, she was a curatorial consultant at Storm King Art Center (1996–2005). Pachner has published and lectured on other important 20th-century sculptors, including Anthony Caro, Gaston Lachaise, Jose de Rivera, and George Segal.

Register Online
Day

Wednesday

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–7:50 p.m.

Schedule
3/30, 4/6, 4/13, 4/20
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
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Edgar Degas: The Printer of Modern Life

Starts April 11
4 Mondays
Instructor: Larissa Bailiff

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A towering figure in 19th-century art, Edgar Degas chronicled the changing world around him through provocative representations of modern life: harshly-lit cafés and café-concerts, shops, race tracks, ballet dancers on stage or at rehearsal, intimate moments in the bath, and even scenes of brothels. This course explores Degas’s radical, restless creativity from the 1850s through the beginning of the 20th century, particularly through the lens of his unconventional engagement with printmaking and his experimentation with mixed mediums. Realism, distortion, technical innovation, process, repetition, recombination, seriality, and abstraction will be key topics in our discussion, as we traverse a wide selection of Degas’s paintings, drawings, prints, pastels, and sketchbooks. In conjunction with the exhibition Edgar Degas: A Strange New Beauty.

Taking this class in conjunction with Modern Beginnings: Impressionists From the Collection is recommended.

Over the last 12 years, Larissa Bailiff has worked as an educator and instructor for MoMA, teaching over 25 in-gallery courses. Her specialty is modern European art and culture, especially that of France and Spain. She recently published a catalogue essay on Agustí Puig, the contemporary Catalan artist whose work was featured in Woody Allen’s 2008 film Viki Cristina Barcelona. In recent months, she has been developing content for a new immersive arts-education and technology company called Woofbert.

Register Online
Day

Monday

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–7:50 p.m.

Schedule
4/11, 4/18, 5/2, 5/9
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
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Marcel Broodthaers: Poet, Artist, Curator

Starts April 11
4 Mondays
Instructor: Francesca Wilmott

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Marcel Broodthaers (Belgian, 1924–1976) maintains a critical if under-recognized place in the history of 20th-century art. Setting a precedent for what we call installation art today, his work has had a profound influence on a broad range of contemporary artists. In 1964, at the age of 40, Broodthaers announced his entry into the visual arts after nearly 20 years as a practicing poet and journalist. Over the next 12 years, until his untimely death in 1976, Broodthaers proposed new approaches to sculpture, painting, printmaking, artists’ books, film, and even museum display itself. From his earliest objects made of mussel shells and eggshells to his most ambitious project, the Musée d’Art Moderne, Département des Aigles (Museum of Modern Art, Department of Eagles), and the “retrospective” exhibitions he made at the end of his life, Broodthaers was often regarded as a pioneer of “institutional critique.” He questioned the very systems that structure art, while remaining acutely aware of the impossibility of retreating from them entirely. On the occasion of his first New York retrospective, this class will explore how one curates a retrospective of an artist who organized his own exhibitions during his lifetime. Students will examine the curatorial process while studying Broodthaers’s work in the exhibition galleries, drawing out the humor, physicality, and poetic qualities of his artistic practice.

Francesca Wilmott (dual MA, School of the Art Institute of Chicago) is a curatorial assistant in MoMA’s Department of Drawings and Prints. She worked on MoMA’s Marcel Broodthaers retrospective with Christophe Cherix and Manuel Borja-Villel, and she previously assisted with the MoMA exhibitions Yoko Ono: One Woman Show, 1960–1971 and There Will Never Be Silence: Scoring John Cage’s 4'33". She has led gallery talks and tours at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice; The Art Institute of Chicago; The Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, St. Louis; and the Saint Louis Art Museum.

Register Online
Day

Monday

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–7:50 p.m.

Schedule
4/11, 4/18, 4/25, 5/2
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
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Histories of Modernism, 1948–1969

Starts April 18
4 Mondays
Instructor: Jennifer Katanic

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This class explores changes in the art world after World War II, from the formation of the New York School through the rise of the global Conceptual art movement. Sessions will explore the transformations that took place between Jackson Pollock’s large drip painting Number 1A, 1948 (1948) and Joseph Kosuth’s iconic text Art and Philosophy (1969), which became the anthem of a generation at odds with cultural institutions and the past. Investigating smaller histories will provide a greater understanding of the ideas that continue to influence art today. Artists covered include Pollock, Mark Rothko, Willem de Kooning, Andy Warhol, and many more.

Taking this class in conjunction with Histories of Modernism, 1889–1919 is recommended.

Jennifer Katanic (PhD candidate, The Graduate Center, City University of New York) is a specialist in postwar Central European art and culture. She is a lecturer in MoMA's Department of Education and works with International Art Guides as a contemporary art educator at Art Basel Miami Beach. She has taught art history at Rutgers University and City College, New York.

Register Online
Day

Monday

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–7:50 p.m.

Schedule
4/18, 4/25, 5/2, 5/9
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
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Steel, Cars, War, and Capital: The Production of Modern Architecture

Starts May 3
4 Tuesdays
Instructor: Jennifer Gray

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Investigate how fundamental innovations and events—what Siegfried Giedion called “constituent facts”—combined to produce modern architecture in the 20th century. Centered on four game-changing factors—steel, cars, war, and capital—this course explores how new materials and technologies, together with money and power, irrevocably changed the course of architecture and created new environments of skyscrapers, suburbs, and infrastructures. Sessions will cover celebrity architects, such as Mies van der Rohe, Frank Lloyd Wright, and SOM, as well as everyday spaces of modernism, such as tract housing and highways. One session will be dedicated to a walking tour of lower Manhattan, a veritable palimpsest of steel, cars, war, and capital.

Jennifer Gray (PhD, Columbia University) is a historian of modern art and architecture, specializing in the relationships between social politics and the built environment. Her work has been published in Future Anterior, Il Giornale Dell 'Architettura, and SmartPlanet. She is an adjunct assistant professor at Columbia University and a lecturer at MoMA.

Register Online
Day

Tuesday

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–7:50 p.m.

Schedule
5/3, 5/10, 5/17, 5/24
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
Daytime Classes

“Stop thinking about art works as objects, and start thinking about them as triggers for experiences.”—Brian Eno

Explore various periods of modern and contemporary art through programs led by MoMA curators and other prominent experts, both inside and outside MoMA’s galleries.


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Conflict and the Body in Modern Art

Starts February 10
4 Wednesdays
Instructor: David Smucker

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Taking inspiration from the exhibition Soldier, Spectre, Shaman: The Figure and the Second World War, this course begins with a discussion of artists who used images of the body to address the physical and psychological toll of the Second World War. In Alberto Giacometti’s thin sculptural figures and Francis Bacon’s distorted fleshy forms, for example, we see reflections of the anxiety that developed after the war. As many artists would later turn away from direct representation of the human form, this class also addresses how bodily traces and metaphors found their way into works by Joseph Beuys, Jackson Pollock, Lee Bontecou, and others. The course concludes with a look at how postwar strategies of figuration have been updated to deal with today’s political and social causes.

David Smucker is a PhD candidate in art history and criticism at Stony Brook University. His research focuses on contemporary art and the history of photography, and his in-progress dissertation examines photography’s relationship to car travel and the American road trip.

Register Online
Day

Wednesday

Sessions

4

Time

11:00 a.m.–12:50 p.m.

Schedule
2/10, 2/17, 2/24, 3/2
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
428_1980_cccr_jacksonpollock

A Closer Look at Jackson Pollock

Starts February 10
4 Wednesdays
Instructor: Heather Cotter

View detail
Close
428_1980_cccr_jacksonpollock

Jackson Pollock is an iconic artist of mid-century modernism whose monumental drip canvases—which evoke the tension and drama of the era in which they were created—are some of the most recognizable images of the Abstract Expressionist movement. But these represent only one segment of a larger body of work produced by the artist. In conjunction with the exhibition Jackson Pollock: A Collection Survey, 1934–1954, this course looks at Pollock’s work in depth, exploring his influences, his varied and diverse styles of painting, and the impact he had on artists that followed him.

Heather Cotter (MA, Boston University, and MEd with a specialization in art education, Harvard University) is a lecturer at MoMA.

Register Online
Day

Wednesday

Sessions

4

Time

11:00 a.m.–12:50 p.m.

Schedule
2/10, 2/17, 3/2, 3/9
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
Pietmondrian_composition_eyeonabstraction_s

Eye on Abstraction, 1880–1955

Starts February 11
4 Thursdays
Instructor: Elisabeth Bardt-Pellerin

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Pietmondrian_composition_eyeonabstraction

Why would artists turn away from depicting recognizable subjects to create works with little apparent reference to the visible world? This course explores abstraction in MoMA’s collection, beginning with precursors like Paul Cézanne and Pablo Picasso before turning to pioneers such as Kazimir Malevich and Piet Mondrian; interwar artists including Joan Miró and Paul Klee; and 1950s Abstract Expressionists such as Jackson Pollock and Barnett Newman.

Students learn about the beginnings of abstraction and consider its impact as what many consider the most dramatic innovation of modernism. Over four weeks, the class explores how the adoption of abstraction encouraged technical exploration and discovery, while also acting as a vehicle for diverse ideas.

Elisabeth Bardt-Pellerin (MA in art education, Concordia University, Montreal) is a frequent lecturer at MoMA and the Guggenheim Museum.

Register Online
Day

Thursday

Sessions

4

Time

10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.

Schedule
2/11, 2/18, 2/25, 3/3
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
Modernbeginnings_impressionistsmonetwaterlillies_s

Modern Beginnings: Impressionists in MoMA’s Collection

Starts March 14
4 Mondays
Instructor: Larissa Bailiff

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Modernbeginnings_impressionistsmonetwaterlillies

This class investigates the lives and achievements of some early masters in MoMA’s collection: the Impressionists. Their radical, evolving experimentation with subject matter, style, and materials overturned decades of artistic tradition, broke the stronghold of the insular French Salon system, and definitively ushered in what we now call modernism. Through sessions in the classroom, in MoMA’s galleries, and in the Drawings and Prints Study Center, we will examine paintings, drawings, and prints from the 1860s to the 1920s. Artists discussed include Edgar Degas, Paul Cézanne, Mary Cassatt, Berthe Morisot, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Camille Pissarro, and Claude Monet.

Taking this class in conjunction with Edgar Degas: The Printer of Modern Life is recommended.

Over the last 12 years, Larissa Bailiff has worked as an educator and instructor for MoMA, teaching over 25 in-gallery courses. Her specialty is modern European art and culture, especially that of France and Spain. She recently published a catalogue essay on Agustí Puig, the contemporary Catalan artist whose work was featured in Woody Allen’s 2008 film Viki Cristina Barcelona. In recent months, she has been developing content for a new immersive arts-education and technology company called Woofbert.

Register Online
Day

Monday

Sessions

4

Time

11:00 a.m.–12:50 p.m.

Schedule
3/14, 3/21, 3/28, 4/4
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
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Modern and Contemporary Art Survey, 1945–1975

Starts March 16
4 Wednesdays
Instructor: David Smucker

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Moderncontemporaryartsurvey_1945_75

This course investigates major artworks and artistic movements as they developed in the wake of the Second World War. We will begin by discussing the development of Abstract Expressionism against the backdrop of the 1940s and the atomic age, and the emergence of New York as an art world center. The course will look at Pop art’s embrace of consumer culture, Minimalism’s particular attention to context and the viewer’s experience, and Conceptual art’s investigation of the limits of the “art object.” Artists discussed will include Jackson Pollock, Yayoi Kusama, Andy Warhol, Robert Smithson, Eva Hesse, and more. The class visits MoMA’s collection galleries and temporary exhibitions, including Marcel Broodthaers, and classroom lectures will also discuss works not currently on view at the Museum.

Taking this class in conjunction with Modern and Contemporary Art Survey, 1975–Today is recommended.

David Smucker is a PhD candidate in art history and criticism at Stony Brook University. His research focuses on contemporary art and the history of photography, and his in-progress dissertation examines photography’s relationship to car travel and the American road trip.

Register Online
Day

Wednesday

Sessions

4

Time

11:00 a.m.–12:50 p.m.

Schedule
3/16, 3/23, 3/30, 4/6
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
Moma_degas_twodancers_printerofmodernlife_s

Edgar Degas: The Printer of Modern Life

Starts April 11
4 Mondays
Instructor: Larissa Bailiff

View detail
Close
Moma_degas_twodancers_printerofmodernlife

A towering figure in 19th-century art, Edgar Degas chronicled the changing world around him through provocative representations of modern life: harshly-lit cafés and café-concerts, shops, race tracks, ballet dancers on stage or at rehearsal, intimate moments in the bath, and even scenes of brothels. This course explores Degas’s radical, restless creativity from the 1850s through the beginning of the 20th century, particularly through the lens of his unconventional engagement with printmaking and his experimentation with mixed mediums. Realism, distortion, technical innovation, process, repetition, recombination, seriality, and abstraction will be key topics in our discussion, as we traverse a wide selection of Degas’s paintings, drawings, prints, pastels, and sketchbooks. In conjunction with the exhibition Edgar Degas: A Strange New Beauty.

Taking this class in conjunction with Modern Beginnings: Impressionists From the Collection is recommended.

Over the last 12 years, Larissa Bailiff has worked as an educator and instructor for MoMA, teaching over 25 in-gallery courses. Her specialty is modern European art and culture, especially that of France and Spain. She recently published a catalogue essay on Agustí Puig, the contemporary Catalan artist whose work was featured in Woody Allen’s 2008 film Viki Cristina Barcelona. In recent months, she has been developing content for a new immersive arts-education and technology company called Woofbert.

Register Online
Day

Monday

Sessions

4

Time

11:00 a.m.–12:50 p.m.

Schedule
4/11, 4/18, 5/2, 5/9
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
Modernartsurvery_1975today_robertgober

Modern and Contemporary Art Survey, 1975–Today

Starts April 13
4 Wednesdays
Instructor: David Smucker

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This course will begin its investigation of contemporary art with the postmodern artists of the 1970s and 1980s, who challenged the “master narratives” through which society defined itself, and explicitly confronted tough subjects like institutionalized gender inequality in their work. Our course then pivots to address artists’ responses to an increasingly interconnected world; we will discuss the influence of identity politics on art, the development of multimedia artistic practices and performance art, the rise of a global art scene, and the place of art in a world seen increasingly through the lens of social media. Cindy Sherman, Sherrie Levine, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Robert Gober, Matthew Barney, and Zoe Leonard are among the many artists we will address.

Taking this class in conjunction with Modern and Contemporary Art Survey, 1945–1975 is recommended.

David Smucker is a PhD candidate in art history and criticism at Stony Brook University. His research focuses on contemporary art and the history of photography, and his in-progress dissertation examines photography’s relationship to car travel and the American road trip.

Register Online
Day

Wednesday

Sessions

4

Time

11:00 a.m.–12:50 p.m.

Schedule
4/13, 4/20, 4/27, 5/4
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
Rosenquist_f111_radicalpractice_new_s

Radical Practice: Art of the 1960s

Starts April 21
4 Thursdays
Instructor: Joan Pachner

View detail
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Rosenquist_f111_radicalpractice_new

This class explores radical artistic developments of the 1960s from a global, multimedia perspective. Discussions cover a range of mediums—including photography, video, commercial design, and architecture—and intersecting aesthetic developments between countries and movements such as Pop art, Minimalism, post-Minimalism and Conceptual art. Artists explored will include both widely acknowledged and lesser-known masters, including Robert Adams, Diane Arbus, Richard Avedon, Günter Brus, Gego, Eva Hesse, Jasper Johns, Louis Kahn, James Rosenquist, Richard Serra, Robert Smithson, and Andy Warhol.

Joan Pachner (PhD, New York University, Institute of Fine Arts) specializes in modern sculpture, and for the past 10 years she has lectured regularly at MoMA. She published a monograph on David Smith (Phaidon, 2013), was a curatorial consultant and catalogue coauthor for Tony Smith: Architect, Painter, Sculpture (MoMA, 1988), and is currently working on a catalogue raisonné of Tony Smith's sculpture. In addition, she was a curatorial consultant at Storm King Art Center (1996–2005). Pachner has published and lectured on other important 20th-century sculptors, including Anthony Caro, Gaston Lachaise, Jose de Rivera, and George Segal.

Register Online
Day

Thursday

Sessions

4

Time

11:00 a.m.–12:50 p.m.

Schedule
4/21, 5/5, 5/12, 5/19
Capacity
25
Non Member

$325

Member and Corporate Member employees

$275

Student/Educator

$200

Sound Amplification Available
Studio Immersions

These four-week, studio-based classes develop students' techniques and creative insights by exploring intersections between art history and artistic practice.


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The Modern Studio: Jackson Pollock

Starts February 8
4 Mondays
Instructor: Corey D’Augustine

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Part James Dean, part Pablo Picasso, Jackson Pollock has become the face of the New York avant-garde of the 1940s and 1950s. In conjunction with the exhibition Jackson Pollock: A Collection Survey, 1934–1954, the course will explore this fascinating painter through a blend of art history, visual analysis, and studio technique. Each week, students will examine one chapter of Pollock's career with a short art history lecture, an extended visit to the MoMA galleries after hours, and a studio session where we will make small paintings using the artist's materials and techniques. Subjects will include the influence of Surrealism and Mexican Muralism, the historical context of Abstract Expressionism, the discovery and mastery of the dripped technique, and Pollock's return to figuration at the end of his life. No previous studio art experience is necessary.

Corey D'Augustine is a painting conservator, a professor of art history, and an artist.

Register Online
Day

Monday

Sessions

4

Time

6:00–9:00 p.m.

Schedule
2/8, 2/22, 2/29, 3/7
Capacity
12
Non Member

$420

Member

$365

Student/Educator:

$310

Sound Amplification Available
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Experiments in Printmaking: Degas and the Figure

March 30
4 Wednesdays
Instructor: Kerry Downey

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Degas worked with monoprinting from the 1870s to the 1890s, and he pushed beyond his formal academic training to experiment with materials and processes in his depictions of female performers. In this four-week, hands-on course, we will gather inspiration from both his approach to printmaking and his subject matter. Degas developed new ways of seeing and representing women’s bodies through techniques of rearrangement and recombination. How do his distorted depictions of dancers and bathers relate to (or contrast with) representations of the female body in contemporary art today? Contemporary performers will be invited to the class and we will sketch them in action, capturing their movements. What impact does the act of looking have on our depiction or interpretation of a performer's body? Using our drawings as inspiration, we will explore basic monoprinting techniques that require no prior skill, only a willingness to experiment.In conjunction with the exhibition Edgar Degas: A Strange New Beauty.

Kerry Downey is an interdisciplinary teaching artist with an MFA from Hunter College and a BA from Bard College. She has been teaching at MoMA for eight years and has recently taught at Parsons and Hunter College. Her art has been exhibited at The Drawing Center, The Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College, Invisible Dog, A.I.R. gallery, Franklin Street Works, and REVERSE gallery, where her work was given a Critic’s Pick by ARTforum. She has been an artist-in-residence at The Vermont Studio Center, The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts, and Real Time and Space.

Register Online
Day

Wednesday

Sessions

1

Time

6:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.

Schedule
3/30, 4/6, 4/13, 4/27
Capacity
12
Non Member

$420

Member

$365

Student/Educator:

$310

Sound Amplification Available
After Hours

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MoMA After Hours: Making Music Modern

March 19
1 Thursday
Instructor: Marianne Eggler

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What do Arnold Schӧenberg and the Talking Heads have in common? The dynamic intersection of music and the visual arts. In the early 20th century, the fruitful interplay between music and visual art contributed to the move toward abstraction in fine art painting and commercial art. This dialogue across disciplines reemerged in the album covers of the new wave. Join us for an evening of modern design, music, and mayhem as we raise a glass to our favorite bands and album covers of the later twentieth century.

Join us for an evening of modern design, music, and mayhem as we raise a glass to our favorite bands and album covers and explore the current exhibition Making Music Modern: Design for Ear and Eye. This MoMA After Hours event includes a visit to the exhibition followed by a discussion and a visit to the downtown music haunt Pianos for a nightcap. Refreshments will be served throughout the evening.

Please note: you must be 21 years or older to register for this class.

This class is also offered on Thursday, March 22

Marianne Eggler is an art, architecture, and design historian who has served as a MoMA lecturer since 1998. A native New Yorker, she holds a BA in art history from the University of Rochester and did her doctoral studies at the CUNY Graduate Center, where she is completing her dissertation on Mies van der Rohe and Lilly Reich's modern domestic interiors. She has lectured both here and abroad on the subject of modern art and design and has taught extensively, both for MoMA courses and at various other institutions, including Parsons The New School for Design, CUNY, and SUNY Buffalo State. She is currently an adjunct assistant professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology, SUNY.

Register Online
Day

Thursday

Sessions

1

Time

6:00–9:00 p.m.

Schedule
3/19
Non Member

$100

Refreshments included

Member and Corporate Member employees

$80

Refreshments included

Student/Educator

$60

Refreshments included

Sound Amplification Available
Artist-Led

These intimate, artist-led workshops and seminars use contemporary art as a source of inspiration.


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Idea Lab: OurGoods.org

March 15
1 Tuesday
Instructors: Jen Abrams and Caroline Woolard

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New York City can feel like a difficult place to make art, but often the resources we need to make our work are right there in our community. The Idea Lab, a facilitated workshop that brings creative practitioners together to share their challenges, resources, and skills, helps connect artists, designers, and craftspeople to share ideas and resources. Participants will leave with actionable ideas, a better understanding of their challenges, and a new support network. This Idea Lab will be facilitated by OurGoods.org cofounders Jen Abrams and Caroline Woolard.

This is a free event, but completion of a registration form is required. Participants should be prepared to share and exchange ideas during the program. The program starts promptly at 6:30 p.m.; please arrive five minutes prior.

Idea Labs are an adaptation of Idea Parties, a format for resource sharing introduced to Caroline Woolard by Erin Marie Sickler at a TradeSchool.coop class in 2010. Sickler learned the Idea Party format from noted career counselor Barbara Sher. The Idea Lab has been refined by Jen Abrams and Caroline Woolard at OurGoods.org over the past six years.

Jen Abrams is cofounder of OurGoods.org, which developed, in part, out of her experiences making and presenting dances at WOW Cafe Theater, a collectively run women and trans performance space. Abrams believes that creative people are more successful when we make our work within a community of shared values, mutual respect, and generosity. When she is not running OurGoods.org or running after her daughter, Abrams is a multidisciplinary performance artist and anti-racism activist. Her current social practice project, Breaking White Silence, invites white people to talk about what white culture is and how it upholds systemic racism, often without our consent or awareness.

Caroline Woolard is an artist and organizer whose interdisciplinary work facilitates social imagination at the intersection of art, urbanism, and political economy. In Woolard’s work, police barricades become beds; money is erased in public; a clock ticks for 99 years; public seats attach to stop sign posts; café visitors use local currency; office ceilings hold covert messages; 10,000 students attend classes by paying teachers with barter items; and statements about arts graduates are read on museum plaques. Woolard is the cofounder of the cultural equity initiatives OurGoods.org, TradeSchool.coop, and BFAMFAPhD.com, and is the co-creator of the discrete projects Barricade to Bed, Shaker Residence, and Of Supply Chains.

Register Online
Day

Tuesday

Sessions

1

Time

6:30–8:30 p.m.

Schedule
3/15
Non Member

Free with registration

Member and Corporate Member employees

Free with registration

Student/Educator

Free with registration

Sound Amplification Available
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Making the Moving Image: Past to Present

April 2
1 Saturday
Instructor: Mark Joshua Epstein

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Even in the age of video, artists remain interested in early experiments in the development of the moving image. Spend an afternoon exploring how technological precursors to cinema have influenced artworks on view at MoMA, including Ernie Gehr’s CARNIVAL OF SHADOWS and works by Nalini Malani and Kara Walker. Draw inspiration from these works of art to create your own flipbooks, thaumatropes, and shadowgraphs, then combine these pre-cinematic technologies with post-digital innovations such as video and GIFs to experiment with image-based narrative and abstract storytelling.

Mark Joshua Epstein is a visual artist based in Brooklyn. He has been featured in group shows including Up for Debate at BRIC, Brooklyn; OVERRIPE at Trestle Projects, Brooklyn; Microscopes and Binoculars at Hoffman Lachance Gallery, St. Louis; and Ten at Vane Gallery, Newcastle, U.K. Epstein has had solo shows at Biquini Wax, Mexico City; Brian Morris Gallery, New York; and Illinois State University, Normal, IL. He has been a resident at the Millay Colony and the Macdowell Colony, and recent work can be seen in New American Paintings issue 122.

Register Online
Day

Saturday

Sessions

1

Time

11:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.

Schedule
4/2
Non Member

$50

Member and Corporate Member employees

$40

Student/Educator

$30

Sound Amplification Available
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The Book of Everyday Instruction Artist Workshop, Chapter Four: “It’s amazing we don’t have more fights.”

April 23
1 Saturday
Instructor: Chloë Bass

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This workshop investigates how varying social distances within the museum gallery can shape the ways in which we relate to art and one another. Approaching the museum as a site of intimacy, artist Chloë Bass will lead participants through an interactive process to consider how measuring and understanding distance can allow us to read the gallery environment in new ways and shape creative narratives about our own relationships in space. Participants should expect some instances of performance and participatory writing. Measuring devices and other materials will be provided; the systems we design to use them will be all yours. The workshop is part of the fourth chapter of Bass’s ongoing project The Book of Everyday Instruction, which explores one-on-one social interaction. Chapter four is focused on the accidental and incidental choreographies created by engaging with other bodies in space. The chapter’s title, “It’s amazing we don’t have more fights,” is a paraphrase from the artist’s mother about successful social behavior on New York’s subways and buses.

Chloë Bass (b. 1984, New York) is a Conceptual artist working in performance, situation, publication, and installation. She is a 2015–16 Workspace resident at Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, and a 2016 Spillways Residency Fellow at Press Street, New Orleans. Her recent work has been shown at Salisbury University, the Bronx Museum of Art, SPACES, the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, the Neuberger Museum, Momenta Art, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, Flux Factory, Kunstkammer AZB (Zürich), and Akademie Schloss Solitude, among others. She has lectured at MoMA, the Creative Time Summit, the International Sculpture Center, the Queens Museum, Parsons School of Design, Sotheby’s Institute, the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico, and Brooklyn College CUNY. She is a regular contributor to Hyperallergic, and a visiting assistant professor at Queens College.

Register Online
Day

Saturday

Sessions

1

Time

1:00–4:00 p.m.

Schedule
4/23
Non Member

$50

Member and Corporate Member employees

$40

Student/Educator

$30

Sound Amplification Available
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Art and Practice with Pepón Osorio

April 26
1 Tuesday
Instructor: Pepón Osorio

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Art and Practice is a series of discussion-based seminars aimed at creating a space where emerging and experienced artists can explore challenges and possibilities in building and sustaining a creative practice. Following each session, refreshments will be served from 8:30 to 9:00 p.m.

What does it mean to be self-taught as an artist? What can self-teaching offer one's work that an institution might not be able to? This session explores the role that being self-taught plays in one's work as an artist, from the influence that institutional education can have to how artists, as creative practitioners, employ self-teaching in their larger processes over time.

This program is free but requires the submission of a response form (below). Due to limited capacity, those who complete this form for multiple sessions will be confirmed for only one session by April 15. For more information, please contact adultprograms@moma.org.

Best known for his large-scale, baroque, and polemically charged installations, Pepón Osorio uses the exhibition space as an intermediary between the social architecture of communities and the mainstream art world. These installations are based on the experiences of communities he works with across the globe. By presenting installations in unconventional places, Osorio also explores how the meaning of art depends on its location. His work has been included in multiple international exhibitions and received numerous distinctions.

Register Online
Day

Tuesday

Sessions

1

Time

6:30–8:30 p.m.

Schedule
4/26
Non Member

Free with registration

Member and Corporate Member employees

Free with registration

Student/Educator

Free with registration

Sound Amplification Available
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Dynamic Encounters: Experiments in Engagement

April 30 & May 1
1 Saturday, 1 Sunday
Instructor: Wafaa Bilal

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This two-day performance-based workshop explores the idea of open-ended performance as a strategy for engagement with viewers. On day one, participants will use the MoMA Archive to explore the history of participatory art making and performance; on day two they will collaborate on the creation and presentation of their own performances.

Practitioners, students, and enthusiasts of all experiences and interests are encouraged to participate.

Iraqi-born artist Wafaa Bilal is renowned for performances that employ technology to provoke dialogue about international politics and the effects of warfare. In 2007, he earned critical acclaim for his interactive performance Domestic Tension, in which he spent a month living in a gallery under fire from a paintball gun. In 3rdi (2010) a camera was surgically implanted in the back of Bilal's head in a yearlong performance on surveillance and nostalgia. Bilal, who lives and works in New York, is an associate professor at New York University's Tisch School of the Arts. His work is represented in major public collections, including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Mathaf: Arab Museum of Modern Art, Qatar; and Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago. He has served on panels at the Tate Modern, Harvard University, Stanford University, and the Global Art Forum, Qatar. His work has been reviewed in Art in America, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal.

Register Online
Day

Saturday, Sunday

Sessions

2

Time

1:00–4:00 p.m.

Schedule
4/30-5/1
Non Member

$50

Member and Corporate Member employees

$40

Student/Educator

$30

Sound Amplification Available
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Art and Practice with Michael Mandiberg

May 4
1 Wednesday
Instructor: Michael Mandiberg

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Art and Practice is a series of discussion-based seminars aimed at creating a space where emerging and experienced artists can explore challenges and possibilities in building and sustaining a creative practice. Following each session, refreshments will be served from 8:30 to 9:00 p.m.

Many people play multiple roles and maintain several identities in the art world, including artist, art worker, curator, technologist, educator, organizer, and culture worker, to name a few. While artists have always had day jobs, it seems that this generation is experiencing something different than previous generations. Many factors may contribute to this phenomenon, including the rise of interdisciplinary practice in the arts, the overproduction and professionalization of increasingly expensive MFAs, and macroeconomic shifts in the bulwarks of the arts economy and culture industry. Beginning with a meditation on his own interdisciplinary work and the ways his boundary crossing has impacted the creation and reception of his work, artist Michael Mandiberg will lead a conversation on the unique opportunities and challenges of playing these multiple roles. Mandiberg's aim isn't necessarily to "problem-solve" (as he has more questions about this topic than answers), but rather to make a space to discuss these realities in one's artistic practice and how one might consider some of these questions together. Our goal is to articulate how these practices intersect and diverge so that we may better understand our own work, and frame this work for others.

This program is free but requires the submission of a response form (below). Due to limited capacity, those who complete this form for multiple sessions will be confirmed for only one session by April 15. For more information, please contact adultprograms@moma.org.

Michael Mandiberg is an interdisciplinary artist and educator. His work traces the lines of political and symbolic power online, working on the Internet in order to comment on and or intercede in the real and poetic flows of information: he sold all of his possessions online on Shop Mandiberg; made perfect copies of copies on AfterSherrieLevine.com; created Firefox plugins that highlight the real environmental costs of a global economy on TheRealCosts.com; and transformed all of Wikipedia into books for Print Wikipedia. He is coauthor of Digital Foundations and Collaborative Futures and the editor of The Social Media Reader. He founded the New York Arts Practicum and cofounded the Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon. He is the recipient of residencies and commissions from Eyebeam, Rhizome.org, The Banff Centre, and Turbulence.org, and his work has been exhibited at the New Museum, Ars Electronica, ZKM, and Transmediale. His work has been written about in Artforum, ARTnews, The New York Times, and The Washington Post, among others. A former senior fellow at Eyebeam, he is currently an associate professor at the College of Staten Island/CUNY and a member of the doctoral faculty at The Graduate Center, CUNY. He lives in, and rides his bicycle around, Brooklyn.

Register Online
Day

Wednesday

Sessions

1

Time

6:30–8:30 p.m.

Schedule
5/4
Non Member

Free with registration

Member and Corporate Member employees

Free with registration

Student/Educator

Free with registration

Sound Amplification Available
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Art and Practice with Janine Antoni

May 10
1 Tuesday
Instructor: Janine Antoni

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Art and Practice is a series of discussion-based seminars aimed at creating a space where emerging and experienced artists can explore challenges and possibilities in building and sustaining a creative practice. Following each session, refreshments will be served from 8:30 to 9:00 p.m.

"I believe that to know oneself intimately opens up the possibility of using one’s strengths and weaknesses in the service of art. Come prepared for inner investigation. I have things to tell you and to show you. Through a series of exercises we will explore movement, the nature of seeing, and their relationships to art making. My goal is to develop alternative ways to nurture our individual creative processes" (Janine Antoni).

This program is free but requires the submission of a response form (below). Due to limited capacity, those who complete this form for multiple sessions will be confirmed for only one session by April 15. For more information, please contact adultprograms@moma.org.

Janine Antoni is a visual artist who employs an amalgam of mediums including performance, sculpture, photography, installation, and video. Her body is both her tool for making and the source from which her meaning arises. She is known for transforming materials like chocolate and soap, and she incorporates everyday activities like bathing, eating, and sleeping into sculptural processes. She carefully articulates her relationship to the world, giving rise to emotional states that are felt in and through the body. In each piece, no matter the medium or image, a conveyed physicality speaks directly to the viewer’s body. Antoni was born in Freeport, Bahamas, in 1946 and received a BA from Sarah Lawrence College and an MFA from the Rhode Island School of Design. She is the recipient of several prestigious awards, including a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellowship, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship, an Anonymous Was A Woman Grant, a Creative Capital Artist Grant, and a project grant from the Pew Center for Arts and Heritage to collaborate with choreographers Anna Halprin and Stephen Petronio on a project that premieres at the Fabric Workshop and Museum in Philadelphia in April 2016.

Register Online
Day

Tuesday

Sessions

1

Time

6:30–8:30 p.m.

Schedule
5/10
Non Member

Free with registration

Member and Corporate Member employees

Free with registration

Student/Educator

Free with registration

Sound Amplification Available
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Art and Practice with Caroline Woolard

May 17
1 Tuesday
Instructor: Caroline Woolard

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Art and Practice is a series of discussion-based seminars aimed at creating a space where emerging and experienced artists can explore challenges and possibilities in building and sustaining a creative practice. Following each session, refreshments will be served from 8:30 to 9:00 p.m.

Artist Caroline Woolard will facilitate conversations between participants about seven kinds of success: mutual respect, financial remuneration, technical ability, learning community, public recognition, personal growth, and political impact. Woolard will give a short presentation on the ways in which her aims have shifted over the past 10 years, and will then lead participants through an exercise and Q&A session. Participants will be asked to articulate which kind of success matters most to them at this time, and to identify ways to act upon these notions of success.

This program is free but requires the submission of a response form (below). Due to limited capacity, those who complete this form for multiple sessions will be confirmed for only one session by April 15. For more information, please contact adultprograms@moma.org.

Caroline Woolard is an artist and organizer whose interdisciplinary work facilitates social imagination at the intersection of art, urbanism, and political economy. In Woolard’s work, police barricades become beds; money is erased in public; a clock ticks for 99 years; public seats attach to stop sign posts; café visitors use local currency; office ceilings hold covert messages; 10,000 students attend classes by paying teachers with barter items; and statements about arts graduates are read on museum plaques. Woolard is the cofounder of the cultural equity initiatives OurGoods.org, TradeSchool.coop, and BFAMFAPhD.com, and the co-creator of the discrete projects Barricade to Bed, Shaker Residence, and Of Supply Chains. Her work has been supported by the Rockefeller Cultural Innovation Fund, Eyebeam, the MacDowell Colony, and the Queens Museum of Art. Recent group exhibitions include Crossing Brooklyn, The Brooklyn Museum; Maker Biennial, The Museum of Art and Design, New York; and Artist as Social Agent, Cleveland Museum of Art. Woolard is a lecturer at the School of Visual Arts and The New School, is on the board of directors of the Schumacher Center for a New Economics, is a 2016 Pilchuck Hauberg Fellow, and will be featured in PBS/Art 21’s New York Close Up series over the next three years.

Register Online
Day

Tuesday

Sessions

1

Time

6:30–8:30 p.m.

Schedule
5/17
Non Member

Free with registration

Member and Corporate Member employees

Free with registration

Student/Educator

Free with registration

Sound Amplification Available
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Political Printmaking: The 1960s and Today

June 4
1 Saturday
Instructors: Kerry Downey and Dread Scott

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Drawing from MoMA’s current installation From the Collection: 1960–1969, artists Kerry Downey and Dread Scott facilitate a gallery conversation and studio printmaking workshop exploring the ways politics have been pictured—both as urgent responses and imagined possibilities, showing what the world is and what it could be. Downey and Scott will discuss how art functions politically. Under what conditions is an artwork made? How is it distributed? What visual strategies are being used? Following a gallery discussion, participants will consider these questions through hands-on experiments with monoprinting. Many profound issues are being debated today: Black Lives Matter, abortion rights, gender norms and the transgender movement, endless war, immigration, global climate change, etc. As this workshop will be thinking expansively about what constitutes the “political,” participants are encouraged to be playful, uncertain, curious, and poetic. No prior skills or knowledge necessary.

Dread Scott makes revolutionary art to propel history forward. In 1989, while he was a student at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (where he received a BFA), he first received national attention when his art caused a controversy over its use of the American flag; the work was denounced by President G.H.W. Bush and outlawed by Congress. Dread Scott's art has been exhibited at the Whitney Museum of American Art, MoMA PS1, the Walker Art Center, and the Pori Art Museum in Finland. In 2012 BAM (Brooklyn Academy of Music) presented his performance Dread Scott: Decision. He is the recipient of a Creative Capital Foundation grant, a Pollock-Krasner grant, and fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts. His work is in the collection of the Whitney and the Akron Art Museum. He works in a range of mediums, including installation, photography, screenprinting, video, and performance. He is on the board of directors of the New York Foundation for the Arts.

Kerry Downey is an interdisciplinary artist and teacher whose work explores the various ways we come in contact with each other physically, psychologically, and sociopolitically. Downey's videos, prints, and performances reimagine the possibilities and limitations of gender, intimacy, and support in late capitalist America. She is a recent recipient of the Joan Mitchell Emerging Artist Grant and her work has recently been exhibited at LACE, Los Angeles; The Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College, Annandale; The Drawing Center, New York; Taylor Macklin, Zurich; and REVERSE, Brooklyn. Downey has been teaching at MoMA since 2007, and has recently taught at Hunter College and at Parsons School of Design. She holds a BA from Bard College and an MFA from Hunter College.

Register Online
Day

Saturday

Sessions

1

Time

1:00–4:30 p.m.

Schedule
6/4
Non Member

$50

Member and Corporate Member employees

$40

Student/Educator

$30

Sound Amplification Available
Frequently Asked Questions


Payment

We accept all major credit cards. To register and pay visit the online registration system.

Discount

Students, educators (K–12, college, and university), and staff of other museums receive a discount on the member rate. Student or staff identification must be presented upon check-in on the first day of class.

Refunds

In order to receive a full refund, notice of cancellation must be sent in writing via e-mail, letter, or fax at least one week before the first scheduled day of class. Payment will not be refunded after this time. Refund processing may take up to four weeks.


If I drop the class can I get a refund?
You will only receive a refund if you cancel your registration at least one week before the first day of class. You may do this by accessing your online registration and clicking the "Modify" tab. You will be able to unregister yourself from a class and receive a full refund. You may also cancel your registration by phone or e-mail. Refund processing may take up to four weeks.

Can I get a refund after the second or third class?
MoMA is unable to grant refunds after the refund period.

If I miss a class can I receive a refund or a make up classes with the instructor?
No. MoMA provides course schedules in advance to provide perspective students the opportunity to plan ahead and make necessary arrangements to attend classes. Students will receive a syllabus and course reader in advance to help themselves prepare for missing class.

Can I take a MoMA Class for credit?
No. MoMA Classes are not accredited. If you wish to receive credit for a MoMA Class, you must organize this with your institution.

How do I register?
To register for online courses, use the online registration system.

Do I have to register online?
Yes. If you have any difficulties using the online registration system, please call (212) 408-8441.

How do I know if a class is full?
If a class is full the website will indicate that the course is sold out. Please note that updates to class availability are made during business hours and courses may fill up overnight or over the weekend. You will know a course is sold out when you attempt to register and the only option you are given is to add your name to the waiting list.

Can I be put on a waiting list for a class that is filled?
Yes. The online registration form includes a waiting list option for sold-out classes. You must fill out the online registration form to be added to the waiting list. Once you complete the registration, you will receive an e-mail confirming that you have been added to the waiting list.

What if I am a member of the Museum?
As a member at the individual level or higher you will receive the members rate. We honor a first-come, first-served policy for class registration regardless of your member status.

How do I sign up for a membership?
If you are not a member and would like to sign up for membership, simply visit the Membership page. If you have any questions about membership, please call Membership Services at (212) 708-9475.

Are Corporate Member employees eligible to receive the member discount?
Yes. A copy of your valid company ID must be faxed or e-mailed to the Corporate Membership Department in order to receive the discounted price.

Will the class have access to the galleries?
When possible, as determined by your instructor and MoMA, students will have the unique privilege to view MoMA's collection in the galleries after hours, during class time.

Will these specific courses be offered again?
Yes and no. There are some courses that will be offered regularly, for example Modern Art 1880–1945 and Modern and Contemporary Art 1945–Present. Some classes may be offered again depending on the instructor's availability, scheduling, and student interest. MoMA cannot guarantee if or when certain classes will be offered again.

If I miss a class and there is another section of the same class being offered on a different day, can I attend the other section of the same course?
No. Each course instructor utilizes a different syllabus. Although there are two sections of the same class offered, the material covered would not necessarily correspond.

Can I register my friend?
Yes. Once you have entered your personal information and selected a class in the online registration form, click the "Add Person" button. Fill out the registration form for this person and be sure to use a separate e-mail address for him or her. Our registration system will not accept multiple registrants with the same e-mail address. Your registration is complete after you have filled out all the required information for both you and your friend and submitted payment. Please note that you will each receive an e-mail confirming your individual registration. Your confirmation e-mail will NOT include a record of your friend's registration information.

Can I bring a friend or family member to attend one of my class sessions so they can experience the program?
No. Though we welcome interest in MoMA Classes, we cannot accommodate guests.


Policies

MoMA reserves the right to cancel or withdraw classes, to change class curricula and scheduling, and to withdraw and substitute instructors.

If an instructor needs to cancel an individual class, we will notify you via phone or e-mail and that class will be made up at a later date.

Students accept full responsibility for personal injury and/or losses suffered during class hours and while on museum premises.

MoMA will not release course participants’ personal information to any persons or organizations outside of the Museum without prior written consent.